"BLUE WHALE RESIDENCY: THE BRAZIL YOU NEVER HEARD GOES TO FRANCE (ENCORE UNE FOIS)"

*At Blue Whale
123 astronaut E S Onizuka St. Suite 301
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Tel: 213-620-0908
*Next show on Thursday, July 9th
*Doors open at 8pm (we'll play two sets)
*$15 cover
*https://www.facebook.com/events/1592610344340370/

We love the Blue Whale, so we decided we wanted to be there A LOT. We are started our residency there on May 7th, we'll be playing every first Thursday of the month with a different spectacle to dazzle and wow your senses.

GOES TO FRANCE
*As the third iteration of our monthly residency at the lovely 
blue whale we will revisit our "Goes to France" episode, one of our more popular ventures, which explores music from France, Brazil and the French Caribbean. The arrangements are intimate, written for a stellar string quartet, Jessica Jeza Vautor and moi - Marcel Camargo...if you came to the last one fret not, there will be some new pieces on this one to keep things fresh.

PREVIOUS SHOWS OF THIS RESIDENCY:

...presents NEW MODERN
*For our second chapter of this monthly residency at the lovely blue whale we will be taking quintessential Brazilian tunes from different times/regions and "modernizing" them - think the Jetsons take a trip to Mars (and they're Brazilian). 

With a dashing cast of characters:
Jessica Jeza Vautor - vox
Katisse Buckingham - woodwinds
John Tegmeyer - clarinet
Amy Sanchez - french horn
Garrett Smith - trombone
Gee Gee Gallegos - Bari sax
Craig Polasko - bass
Gibi Dossantos - percussion

On production and also playing drums, Leonardo Costa

...and yours truly, Marcel Camargo on guitar/vox/production/arrangements/anything the project needs

Tam...Tam...Tam...!
*For this first installment we're coming in with a bang (or should I say TAM...bwahhahaha) and we are performing our versions of the 1958 release Tam...Tam...Tam...! top to bottom. This record was a rarity, largely forgotten over the years and recently revisited and brought to light by singer Ed Motta and DJ Gilles Peterson. It's a phenomenal record and interesting for us for so many reasons; I came to know it through producer Mario Caldato Jr., who showed me the track Nânâ-Imboro, which is a clear predecessor of Jorge Ben's Mas Que Nada. But aside from that, half of the record are modern arrangements of songs that worship the Orixás, African deities that have been transplanted to both Brazil and Cuba via African slaves. The worship songs are sung in Yorubá, the surviving west African language that is still spoken today in Brazil and Cuba - and is very much alive in Nigeria and Benin and other parts of Africa. I'm very proud and excited to explore and celebrate this African side of our history, which is so rich and sadly disregarded in schools and most history books.